The Preponderance of Demoralization

James Governale
5 min readJan 27, 2023

A Hidden Epidemic?

Let’s explore this possibility: Could some of what’s being call depression, actually be demoralization by another name? Beyond diagnosis, individuals often use psychological terms to describe their state of being and how they’re feeling. There appears to be a high propensity of individuals describing themselves as being depressed.

Do you find yourself identifying with feeling depressed? If not yourself, maybe you’re noticing others around you stating that they’re depressed. I notice this occurring, how about you? I believe it’s worth recognizing and exploring what this could mean. Has the statement “I’m feeling depressed” become a broad umbrella term? So broad that there may be something hidden amongst the many individuals who identify as such.

I’m opening this discussion not as a means of diagnosis, rather a way to explore our terminology and references for clarity of one’s true condition. In the spirit of optimal communication for conveying what one actually believes is happening with them. If there’s a predominance of information and references for signaling depression in our society, will that cause an increase of self-identification with it?

What if someone’s depressed feelings are a symptom of something else? What if it’s an issue of demoralization? I believe in some instances, this is the case. But one can only self-identify as demoralized if they are clear that it’s even an option for them. Some individuals are unaware of what demoralization is. Or some may believe demoralization to be something altogether different than how it’s showing up in their lives.

What is Meant by Demoralization?

I believe the average person would describe demoralization as something that happens to someone or that it’s an act taken toward a group of people. While it can indeed be viewed from an externalized perspective, demoralization is also a feeling or a perception they might have for themselves. And yes, this feeling may increase or be maintained by external actions from surrounding forces.

So as we shift the perspective of how one can view demoralization from an internal vantage, we can see how this might be described as depression. It’s not as clear to name or understand from an internal resonance. The…

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James Governale

I’m a holistic health coach & writer living in Brooklyn, NY. I’m the creator of www.highheartwellness.com assisting others to reach desired health goals.